The Final Stretch

This is the last stretch of our project. Today will be the last official day. From now on, I hope that you can get professional help from our two students who are ready and able to help.

We have about 4-6 weeks to get it all together. I will be happy to come over a few extra times to ensure that all of you are ready to showcase your great work to your supervisor and other stakeholders.

Sometime in the next few weeks, ideally around the end of May, I will want to:

  • interview you perhaps in two or three small focus groups to see what you think and what you have learned about yourself and about the demonstration of competencies.
  • get signed consent forms as I also plan to review your portfolios to see what patterns and usage I can find.

Requirements for your Portfolio:

You know better than me what you need, but here are some ideas based on your Wathiqa Document from the Ministry.

  • Introduction page
  • Goals page
  • Competencies list - might be good to have an overall list of evidence in one place.
  • Other features
    • Twitter feed
    • Flickr or other images feed
    • Blog feed?
    • Instagram feed
  • Make sure your stakeholders, or supervisors, have you listed as a friend. They can add a 'Friends' block to their profile to find you easily.

ramaqia board may5

Tips for Demonstrating Competencies

  • Start with your goals page. This should be referenced and linked to your demonstrations. 
  • You may want to highlight larger goals or larger documentation in a separate page.
  • Balance between having links from your goals document and extra pages in a collection.

Tips for Showcasing in Mahara

  • The audience needs to find your artefacts easily so you should direct them to the more important items.
  • Use collections to sort your work. You can use more than one collection and certainly, you should use new collections for each assessment cycle.
  • Clearly label your work and artefacts. You audience may not know what they are supposed to see in any given work.
    • Use the description feature in each page to give some extra information about a particular page.

mahara page description

  • Remember, the profile is for your audience, not you.
    • Think about who is going to look at your profile and how you can make their life easier.

mahara screen profile

  • Consider using three columns with one wider column.
    • There are lots of options for page layout so take a few minutes to test a few different options.
  • You need to include information about yourself in the form of a profile. This may include:
    • Classes taught in a particular semester.
    • List of projects or teams that you are on.
    • You can add a few pieces of information about yourself through the Mahara Profile tool and then add a profile block to your home page.
  • Make sure you use the “Retractable” feature.

mahara block title

  • Give the block a title that personalizes it.
  • Insert your name wherever you can. When stakeholders are looking at your work, they are most likely looking at others' profiles as well and so you want to make sure they know who you are when they look at your work.

General Comments

Documenting your work should become a habit. If done right and well, it is habit-forming. At first, you will need to remind yourself and create a plan of how you will incorporate certain tools to do your work.

Remember, the use of technology will only increase over time. Many of the benefits of technology are really very straight forward. The most elemental and important aspect of all of this work is the ability to manage your files. Much of this work is based on displaying files and you need to be able to manage them, think clearly about where to store them and how to share them. Whenever you name a document or a folder, try to think what name will allow someone else to find the document. That 'someone else' could be you in about 6 months when you come back to find work you did and have not looked at for a while.

  • file management
    • sharing documents
    • accessing documents from multiple devices
    • storing documents for later retrieval
  • Sharing ideas
    • blogging
    • discussion forums
    • online communities
    • portfolios
  • Social media
    • sharing ideas
    • sharing images of activities
    • motivating your students
    • motivating your colleagues

Also remember that you are linking to much of your work or sharing the link with others. That means if you move your work, you will break that link and your work will be harder to find.

Don't forget to look at your colleagues work. Everyone 'sees' their work and artefacts differently and may give you new perspective on your work. Be proactive and ask others to view your work. 

Ramaqia Project in the News

Your colleague and I have been busy promoting our project and getting attention from others for our good work.

Mahara Newsletter: Click here 

Ramaqia Project at  HCT M-Learning Conference, April 10th: Click here

Ramaqia Project at GEF: Click here

Mahara 1.9

Mahara have released 1.8 and will soon release 1.9 (we are using 1.7.2). I will update the site to the latest version before July. I am waiting for you to finish your portfolio and and let Principal Fatima review them in a familiar format before upgrading.

You can view the presentation below to see a preview of the new version.

Published in Ramaqia Project
Wednesday, 23 April 2014 16:00

Cognitive Apprenticeship

In response to a challenge to prepare a mentoring program for new faculty joining our Education Department as "faculty in training" (FIT), I have given some thought to how a portfolio approach to learning may support a mentorship, or to use a slightly older term often reserved for trades - apprenticeship.

The following excerpt is from my literature review, which affords me the opportunity to put all of this work into a context of my own making. So far, this is merely a collection of thoughts on the process and not the process itself. I advocate a portfolio approach to the mentorship which I believe will give the new FITs opportunities to develop their own skills and be partners in their own futures.

learning doing heutagogy

Figure 1: Quest for Integrity through Experiential Learning: 'Learning Then Doing' to 'Doing then Learning'. Based on Blaschke, (2012)

Figure 1 highlights the process of moving from a pedagogic approach where students or lifelong learners learn and then do something, to a more andragogic approach where we actually learn by doing. In other words, we learn about new concepts by applying them to our own 'real' situations. Ideally, we all eventually 'DO' and then learn from our experiences by reflecting upon them.

It also shows the relationship between the three learning approaches.

Relational Education

Kenneth Gergen (2009) notes that “Education in a relational key is critical to the global future” (p. 243). Our ability to communicate with people from around the world means that our community of inquiry (Garrison, Anderson, & Archer, 2000), within which we interact and grow can take on global proportions. The tools at our disposal provide us with opportunities to learn from each other’s mistakes as well as our own in ways never before possible. These tools also allow us the opportunity to access our past more readily and easily than ever before. Given such opportunities, the educational practitioner might be urged to take advantage of a portfolio approach to lifelong learning (Leslie, 2012). In relation to McLuhan’s (1964) notion that the medium is the message, it is noted that 21st century skills and technology forces us to consider the "impact of access to new mediational means in terms of a reorganization of some underlying way of acting in the world” (Crook, 1994, p. 40).

Cognitive Apprenticeship

Gergen (2009) also discusses the concept of cognitive apprenticeship and its role in mentoring new educators. Cognitive apprenticeship may be viewed as an extension of lifelong learning in that both the apprentice and the mentor are engaged in lifelong learning activities. The fact that the apprentice is still at the beginning of their lifelong learning journey is all the more reason to engage meaningfully with lifelong learning practices through a portfolio approach.

A portfolio process can contribute to such apprenticeships by offering glimpses of tasks completed by expert faculty that are “representative of authentic skills” (Dennen & Burner, 2008, p. 426) through the artful demonstrations of competency to be found on the mentor practitioners’ portfolios. From both perspectives, those of the mentors and the institution, and of the mentees or apprentices, a portfolio approach to their lifelong learning or even their on-the-job training, allows apprentices the opportunity to put their own experiences in the context of more experienced faculty.

Researchers (Nichol & Turner-Bisset, 2006; Kopcha & Alger, 2011; Kopcha & Alger, 2014) have noted that the format of professional development activities are often insufficient to simply cause a ‘value-added’ effect on the participants. The view that such development activities would add value seems a simplification of Freire’s (1996) banking method of education where we put something in and expect to get it out later.

Nichol and Turner-Bisset (2006) discuss the concept of “expert teaching protocols” (p. 155) in which a lesson is described in minute detail as an analytical commentary on the activities conducted during a lesson, the point being to provide apprentice teachers with sufficient information to be able to fully understand the manner of the lesson. Such commentaries would need to be available, ideally with the commentator linked and easily contacted through the protocol in order to provide discussion either synchronous or asynchronous (Oriol, Tumulty, & Snyder, 2010). Furthermore, through the portfolio approach model, such commentaries would already be recorded as part of a teacher’s regular demonstrations of artful competency. An apprentice may inspire an expert faculty to write more in-depth reports in order to model certain styles of lesson.

However that same expert faculty would also provide a wide range of less detailed experiences and lessons through their own pursuit of a portfolio approach to their lifelong learning and professional practice, which in turn would offer further support to the apprentice. The resulting body of portfolio showcase materials would be a rich resource for any program, not only providing supervisors with feedback on their program, but also apprentices with sources of inspiration, colleagues with models of good practice and shareable ideas, and students with resources.

Kopcha & Alger (2014) discuss the concept of 'technology-enhanced cognitive apprenticeships' (TECA) in which the student practitioner is supported by the expert teacher or mentor through the use of various technologies. Such technologies as discussed are also the supporting technologies for a portfolio approach. If a college were employing a portfolio approach where their practitioners and educators were already detailing their own work and reflections through the various web 2.0 and showcase tools, the apprentice would already have a rich collection of materials to review, not only from their individual mentor, but also from the wider range of practitioners from whom the apprentice may have already, or is currently taking one or more supplementary courses to their teaching practice or core courses. Kopcha and Alger (2014) note that there are “three essential elements of cognitive apprenticeship: the methods, content, and social aspects of learning” (Introduction, para. 5). These three elements closely correspond to the three elements of the Community of Inquiry (Garrison, Anderson, & Archer, 2000), Social presence, cognitive presence and teaching presence, which have been discussed (Leslie, 2012) as an underlying and supportive model for the portfolio learning approach. Through applying this model to activities through an apprenticeship and by extension through a portfolio approach, such elements as knowledge of self-efficacy (Kopcha & Alger, 2011) can be better monitored and discussed with a mentor.

Community of Inquiry as Model

From our 21st century perspective, the use of collaborative technology can allow a community of practitioners to more readily share this wealth of knowledge that exists in any community of professionals. Certainly this concept is not new, however the methods at our disposal are more powerful than previously and in an example of 'the medium is the message', McNamee (2004) asks, “How can our forms of practice engender collaborative partnerships where diverse voices, competing ideologies, and opposing traditions can all be heard and respected” (p. 406)?

This question can be investigated through a portfolio approach to learning. How can we use the technology tools at our disposal to help provide people an outlet to share their voices? Perhaps more importantly, how can we provide students and practitioners with the opportunities to develop those voices in the first place? We are certainly interested in the messages that are being shared amongst professional practitioners, but we are also, equally interested in the means by which they share this information. Social media tools as one example allow for public displays searchable by anyone. Therefore, we must be cautious simply of the medium in order to preserve the privacy of participants in our community. In this way, the medium influences the message. It also sends a message by virtue of its publicness that its users are an open community, perhaps a welcoming community.

Whether we are discussing a group of students in pursuit of a common course and set of outcomes or a groups of educators bound together from shared goals and purpose within a school or institution, the concept of a community of inquiry can greatly enhance and provide clear guidelines for that community. “A community of inquiry is shaped by purposeful, open and disciplined critical discourse and reflection” (Garrison & Vaughan, 2008, p. 14). In any educational institute, both the students and the teachers are, at any given time, engaged in a variety of activities, all of which can be seen to support a vibrant community of inquiry. (Garrison & Vaughan, 2008, p. 134).

Works Cited

Blaschke, L. M. (2012). Heutagogy and Lifelong Learning: A Review of Heutagogical Practice and Self-Determined Learning. International Review of Research in Open & Distance Learning., 13(1), 56-71. Retrieved January 22, 2014, from http://search.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.hct.ac.ae/login.aspx?direct=true&db=ehh&AN=71275487

Crook, C. (1994). Computers and the Collaborative Experience of Learning. London: Routledge.

Dennen, V. P., & Burner, K. J. (2008). The cognitive apprenticeship model in educational practice. In D. S. Jonassen (Ed.), Handbook of research on educational communications and technology (pp. 425-440). Routledge.

Freire, P. (1996). Pedagogy of the Opppresed. London: Penguin Books.

Garrison, D. R., Anderson, T., & Archer, W. (2000). Critical Inquiry in a Text-Based Environment: Computer Conferencing in Higher Education. The Internet and Higher Education, 2(2-3), 87-105. Retrieved September 1, 2012, from http://communitiesofinquiry.com/sites/communityofinquiry.com/files/Critical_Inquiry_model.pdf

Garrison, D. R., & Vaughan, N. D. (2008). Blended Learning in Higher Education. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Gergen, K. (2009). Relational Being. New York: Oxford University Press.

Kopcha, T., & Alger, C. (2011). The impact of technology-enhanced student teacher supervision on student teacher knowledge, performance and self-efficacy during field experience. Journal of Educational Computing Research, 45(1), 49-73. Retrieved April 19, 2014, from http://search.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.hct.ac.ae/login.aspx?direct=true&db=tfh&AN=66481752

Kopcha, T. J., & Alger, C. (2014, March). Student teacher communication and performance during a clinical experience supported by a technology-enhanced cognitive apprenticeship. Computers & Education, 72, 48-58. Retrieved April 18, 2014, from http://dx.doi.org.ezproxy.hct.ac.ae/10.1016/j.compedu.2013.10.011

Leslie, P. (2012). Portfolio Approach to Learning: Application with Educational Technology Students. In S. Dowling (Ed.), Opening Up Learning (Vol. 1, pp. 153-162). Abu Dhabi: HCT Press. Retrieved February 8, 2012, from http://shct.hct.ac.ae/events/edtechpd2013/articles2012/index.asp

MacNamee, S., & Hosking, D. M. (2012). Research and Social Change. New York: Routledge.

McLuhan, M. (1964). Understanding Media. Cornwall: Routledge.

Nichol, J., & Turner-Bisset, R. (2006, June). Cognitive apprenticeship and teachers' professional development. Journal of In-service Education, 32(2), 149-169. Retrieved April 18, 2014, from http://search.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.hct.ac.ae/login.aspx?direct=true&db=ehh&AN=22089309

Oriol, M. D., Tumulty, G., & Snyder, K. (2010, March). Cognitive Apprenticeship as a framework for teaching online. Journal of Online Learning and Teaching, 6(1). Retrieved April 18, 2014, from http://search.proquest.com.ezproxy.hct.ac.ae/docview/1497210816?accountid=1215

Artful Competence 

10 April,2014

2nd HCT – Dubai Colleges Mobile Learning Conference

Paul Leslie & Samaa Zaki Abdul Ghani:

 

A complaint of, and about, professionals is that they often have no way of "accounting for the artful competence" (Schon, 1983, p. 19) displayed in their daily work. A portfolio approach to learning (Leslie, 2012) offers educational practitioners processes through which to both demonstrate professional competencies and continue to learn from their own work.

This study explores how teachers from Ramaqeia Boys School in Sharjah, UAE, begin to employ a portfolio approach in their own practice, in order to transform the traditional, outcomes-based portfolio into an experiential, lifelong learning process. Demonstrations of competency, or showcase portfolios, automatically become a by-product of their portfolio learning process. Associated skills of the portfolio process then enhance their own lifelong learning skills.

Presentation Address:

http://prezi.com/bibkyl-jnc3d/portfolio-learning-approach-hct-mobile-learning-april-10th-2014/

Presentation Slide notes

 presentation notes mobile

· Opening comments

· Thank you and welcome

· Sponsored / supported by:

Aart Leewunburg, Rozz Albon @ HCT

Principal Ms Fatima al Shamsi @ Ramaqia school

· The two institutions  share common goals and work with each other

E.g. IT Olympics and Ramaqia Conference

· This presentation covers

Theory of portfolio learning as developed by Leslie (2012).

Needs Analysis of ePortfolios conducted by Samaa Zaki Abdul Ghani

Project  at the Ramaqia School.

· Theories behind eportfolio approach

Work at NSCC – Canada

Research Papers

Approach developed over number of years

Now focus of PhD research through the University of Tilburg

· Professionals collect their work in any case.

Different stakeholders need to see different curations of work.

Professional communities

Stakeholders including parents, colleagues, supervisors

· Social construction of knowledge

· Transparency

· Cyclical nature of interaction, collaboration and feedback

· Stages of learning

Pedagogy – Learning then doing

Andraogogy – Learning by doing

Heutagogy – Doing then learning > Reflective Practice

· Curated collections

Can present different, often overlapping  faces to different groups depending on needs and requirements

· File Management

the unglamorous

elephant in the room

BARRIER

· Associated skills

Benefit of approach is the associated skill development

very motivating to many teachers and their stakeholders.

· Needs Analysis

Portfolios in MOE schools

Research on interest and need for eportfolios

· Research Problem

Demonstration of Competencies

· Documentation Process

File Management

· Use of ePortfolios

Process VS Product

· Research Question 1:

Are teachers currently using eportfolios for the professional development in the UAE?

· Research Question 2:

How prepared and equipped are teachers to use e-portfolios to enhance their own professional profiles?

· Research Question 3:

Can the use of e-portfolios help teachers to meet the Ministry of Education expectations for competencies and skills?

· Research Question 4:

Do school principals support the move to e-portfolios?

· Significance of the Study

SMART learning initiative

Mobile learning

21st century learning

· Intent by teachers to use e-portfolios

66% plan to only use e-portfolios in the future.

· Beliefs about e-portfolios

72% believe e-portfolios will provide opportunities to use more technology in teaching.

· Beliefs about e-portfolios

70% think it is worth the time to create an e-portfolio

· Ability

68% feel they need training on creating and using e-portfolios.

· Ramaqia school

10 participating teachers

Full support of Ms Fatima al Shamsi – Principal

Weekly training sessions on wide variety of e-skills.

· Mahara Portfolio (http://mahara.org)

Open source system

Runs on college server

Offers wide range of language support

· Mahara Dashboard

Acts as 21st century AGORA

Offers individual profiles

Offers groups for community of inquiry

· Mahara as aggregator

Individuals retain control of all materials

NOTHING is stored inside Mahara

Content remains the sole property of the creator.

Access is 100% controlled by the creator.

· Spontaneous Innovation

While exploring the technical side of Google Drive, several participants developed an online filing system for both academic and administrative documents that previously had been shared only in hard copy. Certainly, Google Drive was designed for this purpose, but this cohort made their own links between processes.

· Social Construction of Knowledge

During one session, a math teacher successfully embedded her Instagram stream into her portfolio. At first, the group discussed the embedding process, with the math teacher leading the discussion and offering her teaching presence. However, the group then quickly switched to discussing the use of Instagram as an educational tool. At this point, members of the group, by directing the discussion through specific questions, also demonstrated a depth of teaching presence. The portfolio showcase collection of work provided a starting point for a discussion about an educational tool, giving a context for the work and offered the math teacher valuable feedback on her use of the tool.

· Learning by Needing

A discussion arose about how granular the demonstrations should be – should they link a folder of documents or a single document? Smaller documents or one larger document? By being able to actually view examples that the various group members had showcased, they were able to compare the styles and arrive at a rather complex combination of documents and folders, which was eventually presented to the school Principal for her approval. The arrangement arose from the situational and contextual arrangement of examples.

· Credits

site-logo     

The next phase of this project is to actually use the portfolio for its intended purposes.

Purpose 1: Showcase 

This is not its main purpose, but yet is a very important part of the overall process. In order to best present a showcase of your abilities and work, you need to find out what your audience wants to see.

Audience:

  • Supervisor: Your immediate supervisor will provide valuable input into what they want to see. Since they are your audience, make sure they get what they want. The structure of your portfolio should be arranged with the needs of your supervisor, either through discussion individually, or as a group.
    • The supervisor herself needs to be familiar with the process and the tools used to showcase your work.
  • Colleagues – Your colleagues are equally important as an audience. Here you may take more liberty in highlighting your particular skills in order to benefit from your skills and advertise your abilities. You do not know what other people may make of your work and you should not presume to do so.
  • Clients or customers: How do you share your work with your students and or the parents. Many of you are already using a variety of tools to communicate with your parents and students. However, how can you develop a school portfolio or platform to highlight the great work being done and open lines of communication?

Platform or Program Portfolio

port approach system

In this figure, you can see how your portfolio can fit into a larger process of portfolios tied together. The very act of creating a collection of portfolios creates a program portfolio. This could be represented by the ‘group’ in Mahara.

At the institutional level, the administrators and stakeholders have access to all the great examples you have put forth in your portfolios and this can be in turn curated for a wider audience.

Next Steps:

The SWC students will be working with their MSTs in order to offer support to the Ramaqia group. Also…

  • Meeting with Ms. Fatima to determine the overall look of each portfolio. She needs to be able to find what she needs to find.
  • Research on the project:
    • Focus groups of 2-3 faculty supported by a student for translation purposes.
    • Review of status of portfolios.
    • Feedback from Ms Fatima on her opinion of the suitability of the portfolios and the arrangement of content.
Published in Ramaqia Project
Wednesday, 05 March 2014 22:32

Ramaqia Project @ GEF 2014 - Dubai

14:30-16:00 >> EN Room C

gef logo

4-6 March 2014

Dubai World Trade Centre, UAE

Portfolio Learning Approach at Ramaqia Boys School

Education in the 21st century leverages technology to support the learning process. A Portfolio Learning Approach to Education (Leslie, 2012; Leslie, 2013) offers practitioners a framework of e-processes that support activities including content delivery, classroom interactions, demonstration of competencies, and provide a means to reflect upon their work.

The Portfolio Learning Approach starts when a practitioner decides to collect and curate their materials, ideas and artefacts. Once a curated collection begins to emerge, the practitioner will discover and develop opportunities to share ideas and artefacts for collaboration and feedback. The results of these interactions then foster new ideas which can be incorporated into their corpus of work.

An added benefit is the development of the associated, technical, 21st century teaching and learning skills and e-strategies.

Research Project

All teachers in the Sharjah Education Zone maintain a portfolio for professional assessment. This study will provide teachers in the Ramaqia Boys School a 21st century means to create, share, and transform the paper-based portfolio into an on-going portfolio learning process.

Teachers will use cloud-based tools to create their portfolios. An informed selection of tools allows teachers to control their own data. Web 2.0 tools support sharing and collaboration with other teachers both within their school and throughout the zone. An online platform will provide a consistent interface for showcase purposes.

As practitioners build and improve their curations, the best or most representative work can be showcased to various stakeholders. The portfolio platform facilitates tailored versions to be prepared for various audiences including colleagues, parents, administrators and Ministry officials. 

Despite the importance of the showcase element, and the development of associated skills, the essence of this study is the embedded learning opportunities found in the reflective activities of sharing and reviewing.

Speakers:
  • Paul Leslie, Faculty, Sharjah Higher Colleges
  • Samaa Zaki Abdel Ghany, Faculty, Al Ramaqia Boys School

Images: http://flic.kr/s/aHsjUojVZ1

Tuesday, 04 March 2014 23:22

EACE 483 - Week 3 - Build your profile

This week, we will review and move forward with your portfolio development. Please refer to last week's post to discuss the value and use of the portfolio as a developmental tool

associated skills

Portfolio - Associated Skills

The following tables can help you to format your portfolio and in order to show your competencies to your best advantage. We will also look at the PDP documentation and see how you can best represent yourself.


This is an example of how students on the Ipad on Wheels project were able to demonstrate competencies as mapped to the HCT graduate outcomes.

Table 1:


Map of Project activities and Graduate Outcomes for Ipad on Wheels

Communication and Information Literacy

  • Students employed a wide range of technology including learning platforms to:
  • conduct research
  • share materials and feedback
  • communicate with school stakeholders
  • arrange schedules
  • negotiate the style and content of workshops.

Critical and Creative Thinking

  • Students were working through their internship in the unit and had to manage a wide range of issues and unexpected occurrences.

Technological Literacy

  • Students delivered training sessions on a wide array of iPad use that is not properly represented by the workshops.
  • They were able to experience real issues and work through technical problems, offering training to teachers in the same.

Self-Management and Independent Learning

  • Through their portfolios, students demonstrated a great deal of independence and problem solving.
  • They were responsible as a group for the daily operations of the unit including the academic quality of the workshops.

Teamwork and Leadership

  • Alongside their growth as independent learners, they also developed a great sense of trust between the team that only comes with experience.

Vocational Competencies

  • As future Education Technology specialists, they are clearly working towards their vocational competencies.

Table with descriptors and evidence

Table 2:


Graduate Outcomes mapped to descriptors and evidence: Ipad on Wheels

Competency

Descriptor

Evidence

Communication and Information Literacy

  • Students employed a wide range of technology including learning platforms to:
  • conduct research
  • share materials and feedback
  • communicate with school stakeholders
  • arrange schedules
  • negotiate the style and content of workshops.
  • learning objects
  • research posters & projects
  • schedules and calendars for each week
  • variations on each workshop

Critical and Creative Thinking

  • Students were working through their internship in the unit and had to manage a wide range of issues and unexpected occurrences.
  • Anecdotes in journal
  • images of teaching each others' workshops
  •  

Technological Literacy

  • Students delivered training sessions on a wide array of iPad use that is not properly represented by the workshops.
  • They were able to experience real issues and work through technical problems, offering training to teachers in the same.
  • learning objects
  • discussion forum on college based site
  • images / screen shots of their access to different sections of the administrative backend of the sites.

Self-Management and Independent Learning

  • Through their portfolios, students demonstrated a great deal of independence and problem solving.
  • They were responsible as a group for the daily operations of the unit including the academic quality of the workshops. 
  • portfolio artefacts
  • images of teaching
  • student products including digital stories and chats from twitter feeds
  • surveys

Teamwork and Leadership

  • Alongside their growth as independent learners, they also developed a great sense of trust between the team that only comes with experience.
  • Images of teamwork
  • Anecdotal evidence of their work including covering shifts, managing time and transportation

Vocational Competencies

  • As future Education Technology specialists, they are clearly working towards their vocational competencies.
  • images of working with members of their chosen profession
  • emails and reports of dealing with principals at each school

Table demonstrating HCT competencies 

Table 3:

Curated Artefacts

Competency

Artefact

Professionalism and Understanding

  • Certificates of Workshop attendance
  • Anecdotes from colleagues
  • Images of professional treatment of guests
  • Curated collection of work clearly related to competencies

Planning for learning

  • Lesson plans
  • Photos of arranged / organized classrooms
  • Anecdotes from fixing equipment and noting issues to be resolved

Implementing and Managing Learning

  • Videos from the classroom
  • Images from the classroom
  • Observations from colleagues, MST, MCT
  • Feedback from surveys

Assessment and Evaluation

  • Products from student activities
  • Test scores and graphs
  • Anecdotes from students on what they learned

Reflection

  • Journal entries
  • Daily reflective entries
  • Curated collection of work

Please also see the Vanderbilt University Center for Teaching website and their guidelines for teaching portfolios.

http://cft.vanderbilt.edu/guides-sub-pages/teaching-statements/

Here is another article from the University of Michigan.

http://www.crlt.umich.edu/sites/default/files/resource_files/CRLT_no23.pdf

See this article about Teaching philosophies.

 

 

Published in EACE 483
Saturday, 01 March 2014 22:41

EPC 2901 - Week 3 - Build your Profile

This week, we will review and move forward with your portfolio development. Please refer to last week's post to discuss the value and use of the portfolio as a developmental tool

associated skills

Portfolio - Associated Skills

The following tables can help you to format your portfolio and in order to show your competencies to your best advantage. We will also look at the PDP documentation and see how you can best represent yourself.

 


This is an example of how students on the Ipad on Wheels project were able to demonstrate competencies as mapped to the HCT graduate outcomes.

Table 1:


Map of Project activities and Graduate Outcomes for Ipad on Wheels

 

Communication and Information Literacy

  • Students employed a wide range of technology including learning platforms to:
  • conduct research
  • share materials and feedback
  • communicate with school stakeholders
  • arrange schedules
  • negotiate the style and content of workshops.

Critical and Creative Thinking

  • Students were working through their internship in the unit and had to manage a wide range of issues and unexpected occurrences.

Technological Literacy

  • Students delivered training sessions on a wide array of iPad use that is not properly represented by the workshops.
  • They were able to experience real issues and work through technical problems, offering training to teachers in the same.

Self-Management and Independent Learning

  • Through their portfolios, students demonstrated a great deal of independence and problem solving.
  • They were responsible as a group for the daily operations of the unit including the academic quality of the workshops.

Teamwork and Leadership

  • Alongside their growth as independent learners, they also developed a great sense of trust between the team that only comes with experience.

Vocational Competencies

  • As future Education Technology specialists, they are clearly working towards their vocational competencies.

Table with descriptors and evidence

Table 2:


Graduate Outcomes mapped to descriptors and evidence: Ipad on Wheels

 

Competency

Descriptor

Evidence

Communication and Information Literacy

  • Students employed a wide range of technology including learning platforms to:
  • conduct research
  • share materials and feedback
  • communicate with school stakeholders
  • arrange schedules
  • negotiate the style and content of workshops.
  • learning objects
  • research posters & projects
  • schedules and calendars for each week
  • variations on each workshop

Critical and Creative Thinking

  • Students were working through their internship in the unit and had to manage a wide range of issues and unexpected occurrences.
  • Anecdotes in journal
  • images of teaching each others' workshops
  •  

Technological Literacy

  • Students delivered training sessions on a wide array of iPad use that is not properly represented by the workshops.
  • They were able to experience real issues and work through technical problems, offering training to teachers in the same.
  • learning objects
  • discussion forum on college based site
  • images / screen shots of their access to different sections of the administrative backend of the sites.

Self-Management and Independent Learning

  • Through their portfolios, students demonstrated a great deal of independence and problem solving.
  • They were responsible as a group for the daily operations of the unit including the academic quality of the workshops. 
  • portfolio artefacts
  • images of teaching
  • student products including digital stories and chats from twitter feeds
  • surveys

Teamwork and Leadership

  • Alongside their growth as independent learners, they also developed a great sense of trust between the team that only comes with experience.
  • Images of teamwork
  • Anecdotal evidence of their work including covering shifts, managing time and transportation

Vocational Competencies

  • As future Education Technology specialists, they are clearly working towards their vocational competencies.
  • images of working with members of their chosen profession
  • emails and reports of dealing with principals at each school

Table demonstrating HCT competencies 

Table 2:

 

Curated Artefacts

Competency

Artefact

Professionalism and Understanding

  • Certificates of Workshop attendance
  • Anecdotes from colleagues
  • Images of professional treatment of guests
  • Curated collection of work clearly related to competencies

Planning for learning

  • Lesson plans
  • Photos of arranged / organized classrooms
  • Anecdotes from fixing equipment and noting issues to be resolved

Implementing and Managing Learning

  • Videos from the classroom
  • Images from the classroom
  • Observations from colleagues, MST, MCT
  • Feedback from surveys

Assessment and Evaluation

  • Products from student activities
  • Test scores and graphs
  • Anecdotes from students on what they learned

Reflection

  • Journal entries
  • Daily reflective entries
  • Curated collection of work

Please also see the Vanderbilt University Center for Teaching website and their guidelines for teaching portfolios:

Published in EPC - 2901
Saturday, 15 February 2014 01:34

EACE 483 - Week 1 & 2 - Curated Collections

Greetings

It is nice to meet you finally and just in time for your last semester in the program and college.

I am going to supervise 4 of you during your internship this year (Al Narjes KG in UAQ). Additionally, I am also going to spend two hours a week with all of you to get you ready to present a showcase of your work. This is necessary for two reasons:

  • You need to have a portfolio of work for any school that you will teach at.
  • You need to have a suite of IT skills to be able to function in in a school in the UAE. See the Ramaqia School Project

Curated Collections

I have done a lot of this work with other students over the last two years and so have created a lot of blog entries on this exact topic. I will share some of them with you.

curate

See the following entries:

Experiential Learning

You may have heard the term, Learning by Doing, also known as LBD. Basically, this means that we can learn from our experiences and from our mistakes. One other way that I hope to help you learn, is from other people's experiences - conversely I hope that others can also learn from your experiences. We can do this by maintaining a portfolio of our work.

kolb model tp map

As you work through this model of learning, you can see various types of artefacts and experiences that you can document to not only help yourself, but to help your students, colleagues, supervisors and other stakeholders in your work.

Associated Skills

To be an educator in the 21st century, you are going to need a wide range of technical skills to keep up with your students and share your work with the various stakeholders listed above.

You will need to open a range of accounts as well to enable you to access certain social media tools that are now commonplace in the UAE school systems.

  • Google: a Google account brings a range of useful tools
    • Drive
      • document management
      • collaborative skills
      • presentation and organization
    • Youtube
      • Video documentation
      • rich content production
    • Blogger
      • reflective activities,
      • sharing and collaboration
      • highlighting and presenting
    • Calendar
      • organization
    • Plus
      • Sharing, collaborating, learning

You will also need the following accounts:

  • Instagram
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn
  • any others?

 Mahara

e-port meeting

  • Go to http://eportfolio.cisweb.hct.ac.ae
  • Log in using your student ID for your username and password. If it doesn't work, try using a capital 'H'.
  • Once you have logged into your portfolio site, we can start to explore how it works. Watch the video (from the menu to the left) that discusses how to share your profile. 

 

Published in EACE 483
Friday, 14 February 2014 23:57

EPC 2901 - Week 1 - Getting ready

Introduction

Welcome. I am pleased to see the EDTC and Primary students all in one room. We will go through this course together and learn together:

  • This course is shared between myself and Ms Liz so we need to become comfortable working together and coordinating with each other. By 'WE', I mean all of us, not just the faculty or me and you!
  • I would like to note for the record (and for the Primary and Early childhood program students) that we cannot in good faith graduate new teachers who are not conversant with what we might consider "21st century skills".

IT in the UAE Classroom

What have you seen out there in the 'real' world of the uAE classroom? What examples of social media have you seen?

  • Instagram?
  • Twitter?
  • Discussion boards?
  • Facebook?

For my part of this course, I am going to focus on technology skills that you will need to be successful in your classroom.

From the EPC 2901 course guide:

Coursework – PDP Report (Part 1): 20%

  • A detailed report which documents the participation and progress of the student throughout the practicum, which highlights strengths and areas for development.

Coursework – MST Report: 20%

  • Practicum placement report which details the progress through the practicum.

Coursework – Portfolio (e portfolio): 30%
A Practicum Portfolio which includes the following:

  • PDP Report (Part 2)
  • Teaching Plans & Resources;
  • Self reflections for all lessons taught and educational technology resources created.
  • Observation tasks related to the discipline,
  • journal entries during the placement
  • collection of relevant artifacts from the practicum experience should be included.

Final Assessment - Oral Presentation: 30%

  • A presentation or interview based on the placement (up to each individual college/major). The presentation could be linked to an area of the portfolio or teaching session, or integrated with the education course.

Total Weight: 100%

  • Please note that all students will follow the same assessment scheme.
  • However, the actual assessment tasks may vary between primary and Ed-Tech students.

Portfolio Process

For your portfolio work, we will take the first week or so to get all of you up to speed. This will require the EDTC students to partner with a Primary student and walk them through the portfolio process.

Once you have a portfolio system ready, we will examine what you need to do to document and demonstrate your competencies.

Published in EPC - 2901
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