Wednesday, 25 January 2017 15:18

Discussion of Assessment in PME 801

Dear Students,

In this professional learning experience, assessment is ongoing, and evaluation is holistic. I view all discussion board activities and tasks as central to your learning and overall growth.

I engage in each module as a participant, course moderator, and teacher. I loosely follow the ICE (Ideas, Connections and Extensions) Model of assessment as a guide for my interactions. You will note that this model is based on Bloom’s taxonomy of learning.

I will participate in each discussion board activity as much as reasonably possible and will at times pose additional questions for you as a group, or individually. I am a strong proponent of the Community of Inquiry Model of online interactions and have integrated this model into my teaching for many years. I am also an advocate of a social constructionist approach to Education that posits, “human systems are not just living systems that can adapt to the environment, but systems that can imagine a better future and co-create it together” (Camargo-Borges, 2015).

For each task, I will provide descriptive feedback and ask questions to challenge you to further develop your ideas. These tasks will not be assigned a grade, as they are viewed as tools for development and extension. I will note your efforts to challenge yourself and to meet challenges posed to you by me or by your classmates.

There are 2 self-reflections and consultations (as outlined on the work map document), which provide you an opportunity to reflect on specific areas of your performance in the course. These consultations also provide me the opportunity to provide a wider range of comments and feedback to you:

Mid-course consultation: you will complete a rubric of professional inquiry highlighting the criteria associated with your performance in the course. This includes a reflection on your learning to date. I will respond with my own comments and reflection and provide a written assessment of your performance to date in the course. (Please post your completed self-assessment of the Professional Inquiry Rubric to the course Dropbox no later than Feb 12th.)

Final Course Consultation: This follows the same process as detailed above. Once your self-assessment is submitted, I will provide my comments and feedback about your course participation and provide a final letter grade. You will have a chance to respond to your grade before it is formally submitted.  (Please post your completed self-assessment of the Professional Inquiry Rubric to the course Dropbox no later than March 19th.)

Given this approach, you will not receive a breakdown of specific course tasks and associated marks. Instead, you are encouraged to commit to excellence in your learning and in supporting the learning of others. I am happy to discuss any of this at any time should you have concerns about your assessment.

Sincerely, Dr. Paul Leslie

 

References

Camargo-Borges, C. (2015). Designing for Learning: Rethinking Education as Applied in the Master in Imagineering. World Futures, Vol. 71 (1-2)., p 26-39.

Published in PME-801 - Winter 2017

Writing Good Questions

Writing good questions is a very difficult task. We don't want to repeat assessment strategies and principles from earlier in your academic career (I assume you have looked as assessment principles). However, we do need to check to make sure that the questions follow some basic rules.

Reliability: This refers to how well does a question or a test produce the same results for similar students under similar conditions. Basically, if a two students of equal ability take the test, they should get the same score. This is quite difficult to ensure, but we can take steps to make sure our assessments are reliable by:

  • ensuring they are clearly written and unambiguous
  • ensuring they are aligned with course outcomes
  • having a few more questions rather than a few less

There are many other aspects that we need to consider when making a test or assessment reliable. 

vulogo - Writing good Questions

Validity: This quality refers to how closely does the question or test actually test what you think it is testing. 

You need to ensure that your questions are clear and actually test the right skills or content. This does overlap somewhat with reliability, but here the difference is that a test can be reliable, but not actually test what you think it is testing.

This is particularly difficult with second language learners. Your test about concepts behind good presentations might actually be a test of vocabulary, not presentation skills.

 


 

As far as your quizzes and assessment tasks are concerned in your Moodle sites, we will not worry too much about these concepts, but I do want good assessments. They need to be fair, reasonable and accurate.

  • Do not give a test or quiz with 5 true and false questions.
  • Do not give a quiz with only three questions.
  • Try to make sure there are no spelling errors.
  • Take your own test. Did you get all the answers right?

 


 

Assignments and Discussions

Click here for a review of rubrics and considerations when creating assignments. When creating your assignments, please consider the following:

Read my article on Discussion boards. How can you have a discussion if you are not discussing?

  • Assignments:
    • If you have an assignment, is there a rubric?
    • Do students know how to submit?
    • Is there a scope?
    • Is there a printable document that can be downloaded and taken home?
    • Is there something that can be sent out or read online?
  • Discussion boards
    • Can they actually answer the question you are asking?
    • Is there a word count?
    • Is there sufficient timeline for completion?

 


Apply to Moodle

Finally, you need to be able to realize these strategies in the Moodle site. How can you meet and demonstrate these strategies and requirements in your site?

One issue that we should consider is versatility. According to the Vanderbilt site, versatility applies to the ability of the testing tool to test different levels. Think about discussion boards and how you might extend or differentiate a good discussion board question.

In an EDTC format, we also want to consider how easily the work can be shared. Think about your school and how teachers often try to integrate different subjects. How could your questions be shared across courses or between teachers.

 

Published in EDT 3505
Tuesday, 21 January 2014 03:51

Google Drive as Assignment DropBox

Associated Skills of the Portfolio Process

One application of Google Drive is as an Assignment DropBox.

 cloud associated skills

To allow your students to use Google Drive as a dropbox, first of all, you need to ensure that:

  • All students have their own Google account (see Google Education).
  • You have a Google account!
    • If you have a GMAIL account, you also have a Google Drive account, Youtube, Google+, Blogger etc.
  • All students have set up their Google Drive. They should have Google Drive installed on their laptops, although this not necessary.

There is more than one way to approach this task. Here is one easy way.

If you have not used your Google+ account, preview it before class. Just click on the  square in your account area at the top of any google page, where you are logged in and then select G+.

google toolsGoogle+

With your students in class, have them search for you in Google+. Once they find you, have them add you to a circle. They can create a circle or add you to an existing one.

 

google circles add

Once you are added to their circles, you can easily search for your students and add them to your own circle.

google circles added

I recommend that you plan the circles and names carefully. Circles are great tools for communicating to specific groups of people. 

  • Note that it is not required to have people in Circles to share a folder with them, but circles do make the process much easier.

You can also simply go to Google+, click on People and then look in "Have you in circles".

google circles

Once you add students to a circle, you can check to see who is in the circle.

google edtcstudents

Next, go to the folder in your Google Drive account that you will use for the assignments. Right click on the folder and select share. You will see the following window.

google drive shareLink

In this window, you can select Google+ as the way to share the file. This allows your students to find the link easily. You will get the following window.

 

google drive share window

You can then share the folder with the circle you created that holds the students. The circles will appear as choices in the "Add People" section.

 

google drive share notice

A notice will appear on your home page in Google+. Similarly, the students in the circle will also see the same notice on their Google+ home page.

Click on the folder link. You will see a button that asks you to add the folder to your Drive.

google drive share opendrive

Students

Once in the folder, you can:

  • Create a new folder and name it with your name and student ID:
      • Fatima Ahmed h0012345
    • Right-click on the folder and then select share.
    • In the Share setting, click on 'Change'

google changeaccess

  • and then, select Private...

google sharing setting

  • Once you do this, you can then simply save the setting and only you and your teacher (the person who originally created the parent folder) will be able to see that folder.
Wednesday, 08 January 2014 15:55

EDUC 403 - Final

Here is your final assessment overivew for EDUC 403:

ASSESSMENT

LOs

%

WEEK

Journal reports

  •     Appreciative Inquiry Interview
  •     Journal entries and comments (Portfolio)
 



15
15



5
14

Report - Justification of TP Choice

 

20

7

Needs Analysis

 

20

13

Draft Proposal and presentation

 

15 + 15

16

TOTAL

 

100

 

If you recal from Week 11, the journal entries section is your portfolio. The assessment is in last week's entry. Here is the actual assignment:

ASSESSMENT TASK DESCRIPTION

Below are the sections that you should include within the portfolio:

Professional Introduction

Resume

  • Personal Details (Name, address, phone, email)
  • Education (list your degree & expected graduation date)
  • Teaching Practice Experience (list, in reverse chronological order, your experiences to date, include grades you taught)
  • Related Experience (summer jobs? any volunteer work?)
  • Special Skills (e.g. IT, First Aid)
  • Professional Development Activities (seminars/workshops, given and attended)

Best Practice examples

In this section, you should select artifacts from your teaching that you believe shows a good understanding of how children learn languages. This selection highlights knowledge and skills essential for effective teaching. In this section you should demonstrate how you have achieved competency in the different areas by presenting examples of your best work.

Critically select, describe and justify this selection from your best:

  • Curriculum units,
  • Lesson plans,
  • Teaching Resources,
  • Examples of student work,
  • Analysis/Reflections of teaching.
  • Pictures of your classroom, activities, displays and videos

Reports and Observations

In this section you should show what others have said about you and your teaching.   Have a look through your reports, lesson feedback and other comments you may have. Select sections or sentences or phrases, explain their background and relevance. Remember peer observations, too.

Commitment to Professional Development

In this section, you should show how you have taken and are taking your own professional development seriously – in the spirit of a professional reflective practitioner. Additionally, you can include:

  • A reflection on some of your professional reading
  • An analysis of some classroom teaching strategies that you implemented or observed
  • Samples of teaching materials you developed and examples of student work
  • You can also include any conferences you have attended, workshops in school or college.

Achievements

In this section, you can broaden the range of artifacts beyond the B.Ed degree and give a more complete sense of yourself. Select some awards or certificates you are proud of (but leave out the under 5 spelling competition you won); are there any letters of appreciation you have received from teachers? Or students? Or peers? You can include here any other college work or achievements (B.Ed or non B.Ed) that you are proud of, or which you think says something about you

Submission

The portfolio and learning goals are to be submitted through your Mahara site.

Published in EDUC 403
Wednesday, 08 January 2014 15:33

EDUC 404 - Final

This is a summary of your final assessments and tasks. The original assessment scheme looked like this

ASSESSMENT

LOs

%

WEEK

Executive Summary

1

20

5

Learning Object   - Content & Activities

2

15+15

8 / 14

CMS Map and SWOT

3, 4

20

12

CMS and Presentation

4

30

16

TOTAL

 

100

 

I have not changed the assessments, but I have edited the titles to look like this:

ASSESSMENT

LOs

%

WEEK

Executive Summary

1

20

5

Learning Object   - Content & Activities

2

15 + 15

8 / 14

CMS Map and Presentation

3, 4

15 + 15

12

CMS

4

20

16

TOTAL

 

100

 

So, once you have finished your presentation, you should have "more or less" finished your map.

The final assessment is of course the Moodle site. Again, you should have "more or less" finished the site. If you look at Week 11/12, you will see an overview of what you should have done.

Here is the assessment:

CMS

This assessment is learning outcome 2, from EDUC 404:

  • Implement a learning management system (LMS) or content management system (CMS).
    • Sub-outcome 01: Install and configure an LMS or CMS recommended in learning outcome 1, sub-outcome 5.
    • Sub-outcome 02: Configure and customize the LMS or CMS to reflect a particular learning setting/organization.
    • Sub-outcome 03: Set up containers (eg. Pages, placeholders, modules, etc.) for a minimum of one learning experience / learning object on an LMS or CMS (see learning outcome 3).
    • Sub-outcome 04: Set up a minimum of one class group or group of users and enroll that group in the learning experience / learning object in sub-outcome 3.
    • Sub-outcome 05 : Set up collaborative learning tools such as a wiki, web forum or interactive chat on an LMS or CMS

Task

You will complete the design of your CMS which includes the various features specified in LO 2.

  • The actual site and template
  • Titles, categories and course names
  • Learning objects X 2
    • Lesson tool
    • Book tool
  • Users enrolled into the courses
  • Variety of collaborative tools including wikis, discussion boards,

Submission

The link to your site should be submitted on a word document to your assignment folder in Google Drive. I will use this same document to access your site and write my feedback.

Published in EDUC 404
Friday, 04 October 2013 06:43

Google Drive for Assignment Submission

With the demise of SharePoint as an academic tool, we need to find another e-submission method (not email). Here is what I propose.

We will test drive Google Drive. To do this, you should:

  • Make sure (finally) that you have added your college email to your Google account

 

google account access

 

  • Then, confirm that you are member of the EDTC Circle in Google Plus. To do so, simply go to Google Plus, click on People and then look in "Have you in circles".

 

google circles

 

  • Once there, check to see if you are in the EDTC students circle. If you are not, then add me to your circles and I will see you. I can then add you to the circle.

 

google edtcstudents

 

  • Then, go to your home page  and look for this notice:

google plus share

  • Click on the folder link. You will see a button that asks you to add the folder to your Drive. Do so. Once in the folder:
    • Create a new folder and name it with your name and ID:
      • Fatima Ahmed h0012345
    • Right-click on the folder and then select share.
    • In the Share setting, click on 'Change'

google changeaccess

  • and then, select Private...

google sharing setting

  • Once you do this, you can then simply save the setting and only you and I will be able to see that folder.
Friday, 13 September 2013 18:47

Portfolio Learning and Assessment

Portfolio as Process - Portfolio Learning Approach

I often discuss portfolio as a learning process. In fact, I promote the concept of a "Portfolio Learning Approach", or more simply "Portfolio Learning" (Leslie, 2012; Leslie, 2013) and will state that any dedicated practitioner must follow a portfolio approach to their practice in order to develop their skills and pursue lifelong learning. In this view of portfolio, the process emerges as the main and most important aspect of the portfolio.

Trevitt and Stocks (2012) discuss the importance of the process behind a portfolio:

“Because the experience of practice is inevitably fragmentary and partial, the very mechanism of devising and compiling a portfolio is intended as a means through which participants can begin to see and present a more integrated whole” (p. 254).

This statement is reminiscent of Freire (1996) and his comments about placing artefacts within the totality of the context from which they were collected. The collection of artefacts, reflecting on those artefacts, considering professional experiences in the classroom and out, provides the professional practitioner a means through which to make sense of all of their daily work and activities.

Portfolio Assessment

If a portfolio process has been "shaped by purposeful, open, and disciplined critical discourse and reflection” (Garrison & Vaughn, 2008, p. 14), then the resulting collection should provide multiple audiences with a means of assessing the professional development of professional and student practitioners.

One such audience could be the administration of a school. In this case, the stakeholders and interested parties may be interested in teaching comptencies:

Figure 1:
Competencies for the Learning Professional

Competency

Skills

Evidence

Teaching

Supervisor

Educator

Content Expert

Classroom manager

Observation

Interviews

Lesson plans

Materials

Partnership

parents & care-givers

Colleagues & school management

stakeholders

Letters & emails

Responses to directives

Feedback

Learning

Lifelong learner

Innovator

Researcher

Independent learner

Reflective Practitioner

Journal Entries

Forum entries

Certificates

Personal Learning Plan

Based on Meeus, Van Petegem, & Engels (2009, P. 402)

Trevitt and Stocks (2012) discuss the concept of 'authenticity' in portfolios. Converse to assumed requirements in assessment, they comment that subjectivity and not objectivity is a signifier of authenticity, stating that, “the candidate has grappled with and come to an understanding of his or her particular context" (p. 251).

Table 1.
Signifiers of Authenticity

Criteria for ‘authenticity’

Outstanding

Pass

Unsatisfactory

Professional context

 

Insightful, reflective account of teaching context.

Often makes reference to one or more ‘critical incidents’

Descriptive account of teaching context.

Some situational reflection on challenges

Basic instrumental/ factual account.

Inadequate contextual details provided on issues being discussed

experience and practice

Integrated account which relates core concepts with specifics of own teaching practices.

Offers clear insights into how and why certain approaches work, and how this is known (evaluated).

Articulates how own practice has developed and/or how reading has influenced thinking, and/or practice.

Offers a rationale for why certain approaches are relevant

Little or no sense of development.

No integration of any ideas from wider reading.

Little or no attempt to implement any self-evaluation, or solicit feedback from others

Core concepts/

key ideas

Integrates relevant ideas and themes into account of own

situated practice.

Articulate across a range of teaching perspectives.

Likely to engage with the

literature in a sustained, thoughtful, or critical

manner.

Makes logical reference

to a core of relevant

literature

Expanded awareness of the range of teaching

perspectives.

Uses relevant technical

terms as required

Poor or no use of sources

Conceptions of

teaching largely

confined to teacher focussed

perspective.

using terms that examiner will be looking for.

Continuous Professional Learning (CPL)

Internalised sense of self, practice and agency.

Purpose of CPL explicitly

apparent.

Goals are perceived as necessary, underpinning

professional practice.

Some interaction between self and purposes of CPL

Implicit sense of purpose in CPL

CPL goal show how objectives inform or shape practice.

Little or no concept of CPL.

Little sense of self, practice

and agency.

Sense of CPL as external

imposition.

Coherence of writing style

Fluent, articulate, use of

specialist language

Explicit structure, cogently organised and expressed.

Process of argument and discovery.

Rigorous attention to detail in

bibliography.

Publishable standard (or contains elements which are).

Adequate grasp of key ideas, terminology, etc.

Logically and coherently

organised.

Adequate bibliographical

details.

Oversimplification of

key ideas

Makes unjustified links

Fails to engage with key ideas and/or specialist language

Disjointed, unstructured,

incomplete

Errors in bibliography.

Adapted from (Trevitt & Stocks, 2012, p. 252)

References

Freire, P. (1996). Pedagogy of the Opppresed. London: Penguin Books.

Garrison, D. R., & Vaughan, N. D. (2008). Blended Learning in Higher Education. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Leslie, P. (2012). Portfolio Approach to Learning: Application with Educational Technology Students. In S. Dowling (Ed.), Opening Up Learning (Vol. 1, pp. 153-162). Abu Dhabi: HCT Press. Retrieved February 8, 2012, from http://shct.hct.ac.ae/events/edtechpd2013/articles2012/index.asp

Leslie, P. (2013). Communcities of Inquiry and Assessment: Graded Discussions. In S. Dowling (Ed.), Redefining Learning (Vol. 2, pp. 153-164). Abu Dhabi: HCT Press.

Meeus, W., Van Petegem, P., & Engels, N. (2009). Validity And Reliability Of Portfolio Assessment In Pre-Service Teacher Education. Assessment & Evaluation In Higher Education, 34(4), 401-413. Retrieved September 13, 2013, from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eric&AN=EJ865430

Trevitt, C., & Stocks, C. (2012). Signifying Authenticity In Academic Practice: A Framework For Better Understanding And Harnessing Portfolio Assessment. Assessment & Evaluation In Higher Education, 37(2), 245-257. Retrieved September 13, 2013, from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eric&AN=EJ955001

Tuesday, 07 May 2013 08:02

EDUC 409 - Portfolio Assessment

Your next assignments are:

EVALUATION AND PRESENTATION OF INTERNSHIP
STARTING WEEK 14: SUNDAY MAY 26TH

10 % of your final grade for EDUC 409

port present 2013

 

portfolio self other

ASSESSMENT TASK DESCRIPTION

Presentation

Your presentation must demonstrate the following:

  • Overview of the teaching placement location and setting including details of classes taught etc.
  • Clear accounting of numbers of classes taught, and other related duties
  • Discussion of how technology supported your internship. Discuss specific features and / or tools.
  • Discussion of your teaching philosophy using specific examples from your experience and research to support your beliefs.
  • Your jounral enties and daily reflections should highlight and record significant events that occured during your internship.

Notes

  • You should consider or mention the evidence of meeting / supporting the professional competencies (see this article).
  • You should refer to specific artefacts from your teaching practice.
  • You should refer to your internship journal entries

Submission

You may use any presentation tools. However, we will expect to see the evidence presented from the context of the portfolio.

The presentations will start on Sunday, with the schedule being arranged by the individual mentors.

  • You should NOT exceed 30 minutes, including questions. So, you should plan on 20 minutes or so of presentation. You KNOW we will ask questions!
  • (Most of) You will present to your mentor only.
  • You will have an audience of students that you will select.
    • You can only select one person from your school
    • You will select at least two others from different internship locations
    • The audience should help you by being prepared with some questions and a friendly face in the crowd.
  • The three of us (Mr. Matt, Dr. Simon and I) will moderate one student from each of our 'mentorships'.
    • This will be determined mainly by schedule but we are willing to entertain suggestions.

 

INTERNSHIP PORTFOLIO

Due JUNE 13, WEEK 16.

Part one: Journal Entries - 10%
Part two: Portfolio - 20%

Part one:

Complete and submit five journal entries and four responses to your classmates related to your recent teaching practice.

Journal Entry 1- Due Date: End of 2nd Week of TP.

Briefly describe your teaching context. Outline one positive experience and one challenge you have had so far during teaching practice and reflect on these experiences. Your entry should be ~ 400 words.

Provide a title for your entry that tells the reader what the entry is about.

Journal Entry 2, 3, 4 – Due Date two days after each MCT visit

You will reflect on the feedback from your MCT and comment on the various aspects of the MCT feedback report. You should discuss and compare any differences between your impression of the visit and the MCT’s comments. Your comments should include ideas on how to improve on constructive criticism from the MCT.

Choose a title for your entry that tells the reader what the entry is about.

All Responses

Choose one posting to respond to and focus on outlining possible solutions to the problems discussed. You are encouraged to respond to a posting from a peer from another teaching placement.

Journal Entry 5 – Due Date: Week 14

The final entry should outline three professional learning goals.

These goals should be formulated from self-reflection and feedback from your mentors and peers on your past and present teaching. Each goal should address one or more of the teaching competencies; Planning for learning, Teaching Strategies, Classroom Management, Assessment & Monitoring, Communication Skills and Critical Reflection.

Describe how you plan to achieve your professional learning goals. You should consider what resources you may access to achieve each goal (for example, professional reading, feedback from mentors and peers, contacting and/or joining professional organizations).

As a follow-up assignment to the presentation of your portfolio, you will then consider all questions and feedback on your portfolio and incorporate those elements into your portfolio.

Part Two:

These are the sections that you should include within the portfolio:

Introduction:

An introductory home page to introduce yourself

  • Resume
    • Personal Details (Name, address, phone, email)
    • Education (list your degree & expected graduation date)
    • Teaching Practice Experience
    • Related Experience
    • Special Skills (e.g. IT, First Aid)
    • Professional Development Activities (seminars/workshops, given and attended)
  • Philosophy of Education

Artefacts

  • Working Collection
  • Curated Collection
    • Critically select, describe and justify this selection from your best: (see this article again).
      • Curriculum units,
      • Lesson plans,
      • Teaching Resources,
      • Examples of student work,
      • Analysis/Reflections of teaching.
      • Pictures of your classroom, activities, displays and videos
      • Reports and Observations
        • Awards, certificates etc.
      • Commitment to Professional Development
        • A reflection on some of your professional reading
        • An analysis of some classroom teaching strategies

 

Published in EDUC 409